Google’s mobile-friendliness changes explained

Google’s mobile-friendliness changes explained

By now you should be aware that this month, Google has changed its algorithm to include “mobile friendliness” in its search engine rankings.

Basically, if your website is formatted for mobile devices, it will have a better chance of showing up in the search rankings than a site that is not mobile-friendly.

Just to be clear – as there has been some misunderstanding around the topic – this is only for mobile search results, i.e. if your website is not mobile-friendly then this will not affect search rankings undertaken on your computer.

This makes sense, given the number of mobile users has now surpassed the number of people who access the internet via desktop computer. In January 2015, it was estimated there are 3.649 billion mobile device users worldwide.

Google says that sites that aren’t as mobile-friendly won’t disappear. They may still rank highly if they contain great content that’s relevant to others.

So if your website looks exactly as it does on your phone as it does on your computer – with tiny text and it’s difficult to navigate, then it’s likely your website is not compatible with mobile devices.

Having a mobile-friendly site is also better for business. If you’re wanting to be seen as a market or industry leader, or if you want to show you have a superior product or service over your competitors, this needs to be reflected in your online presence.

Google says visitors are more likely to abandon sites that aren’t mobile-friendly, and that 74% of people say they’re more likely to return to a mobile-friendly site.

You can check whether your website is mobile-friendly by taking the Google mobile-friendly test.

At Scope Media, we can put you in touch with the best web designers and developers in the Queenstown and Wanaka region. Plus if you need help with your overall digital marketing strategy, we’re here to help.

Image: Google Australia

Written by Celia Crosbie

Celia is an award-winning journalist who has worked for newspapers and radio stations in New Zealand and magazines in the United Kingdom. She has worked in public relations in both NZ and London. Celia also specialises in digital media strategy and website copywriting for SEO.

@CELIACROSBIE